Broke and Bespoke

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Vintage Southwick SC and a Louis Walton handmade silk repp tie.

Vintage Southwick SC and a Louis Walton handmade silk repp tie.

Just when I thought it was getting warmer we had a cool snap. I had to adjust accordingly with this Southwick tweed jacket that is a nice F/W weight, but with some very spring-colored windowpaning.

Sneak Peek: Packing…

Sneak Peek: Packing…

To be honest, the weather has been much too cold for me to want to don shirt and tie for the last week or so. Thus, the random posts with me in a pea coat, duffle coat, etc. Yesterday, however, despite still low temperatures, I missed the feel of a nice sport coat. And, since it was in fact the coldest day of this spell, I layered up with a cable knit lambswool crewneck sweater from Brooks Bros., a vintage tweed sport coat from Southwick, and my Gloverall duffle coat over it all. The bow tie is one I bought last year from the Tie Bar’s special Jesse Tyler Ferguson tietheknot.org line of ties where proceeds go to support marriage equality in the U.S.     

To be honest, the weather has been much too cold for me to want to don shirt and tie for the last week or so. Thus, the random posts with me in a pea coat, duffle coat, etc. Yesterday, however, despite still low temperatures, I missed the feel of a nice sport coat. And, since it was in fact the coldest day of this spell, I layered up with a cable knit lambswool crewneck sweater from Brooks Bros., a vintage tweed sport coat from Southwick, and my Gloverall duffle coat over it all. The bow tie is one I bought last year from the Tie Bar’s special Jesse Tyler Ferguson tietheknot.org line of ties where proceeds go to support marriage equality in the U.S.     

Jacket: Southwick for Cable Car Clothiers, thrifted $10 + altered $50. 
I’ve written about this jacket before here. When I bought it, it fit perfectly in the shoulders and arms, but was gigantic in the waist. I loved the colors in the tweed herringbone so much, and since it was a high quality piece, I paid to have it altered. It now fits loosely and casually, and is perfect for layering over a sweater on a chilly fall day.

Jacket: Southwick for Cable Car Clothiers, thrifted $10 + altered $50. 

I’ve written about this jacket before here. When I bought it, it fit perfectly in the shoulders and arms, but was gigantic in the waist. I loved the colors in the tweed herringbone so much, and since it was a high quality piece, I paid to have it altered. It now fits loosely and casually, and is perfect for layering over a sweater on a chilly fall day.

Jacket: Southwick, SF B+S board $25
Shirt: PRL Italian-made oxford spread collar, thrifted $7

Jacket: Southwick, SF B+S board $25

Shirt: PRL Italian-made oxford spread collar, thrifted $7

Blazer: Southwick for The Andover Shop, thrifted $17

Shirt: Uniqlo OCBD, $19

Tie: Lands’ End, thrifted $2

Jeans: Red Cotton Denim, courtesy of Red Cotton Denim

Socks: Richer Poorer, Fab.com

Shoes: Meermin, courtesy of Meermin

The 3 roll 2 Lapel
These days people rarely want to wear 3 button suits or sport coats. It looks a little outdated, and was the norm in the 1990s—an era we are still hesitant about remembering for its sartorial choices. I have seen it tastefully done of late on some very stylish men who are clearly trying to bring it back. But I digress…
Something that’s been in vogue for quite some time within contemporary tailored menswear, however, is the 3 roll 2 button/lapel configuration. It seems pretty de rigueur on most soft structured Neapolitan-style jackets these days, and has long been the favorite of the American Ivy League and ‘Traditional’ set. You know, the ‘man in the grey flannel suit,’ and the titular ‘man in the Brooks Brothers shirt’ in Mary McCarthy’s short story of the same name.
And though I’m no expert at these things, I have found in my limited experience that Americans and Italians (as in many other things) generally approach the 3 roll 2 differently.
Pictured here is a quintessentially American example of the form. It’s a navy hopsack blazer by Southwick from The Andover Shop. You’d be hard pressed to get more traditional than that. Note the fine finishing on the interior of the top buttonhole. It’s clearly meant to be seen, and not hidden under the roll of a lapel. The other two buttons are not finished nearly as nicely on the unseen side of the jacket. This lapel rolls smoothly, and quite low. There would be no mistaking the fact that it ought not be buttoned at the top button. Some Brooks Brothers and J. Press jackets I own have a much more aggressive and hard 3 roll 2 lapel.  The lapel doesn’t begin rolling much until below the top buttonhole on those. It’s a different look, and one that I personally like less.
On the other hand, I’ve noticed that the Italian jackets that I own that are 3 roll 2 do so a little higher up on the lapel, and always in a very subtle manner. The jacket, when buttoned, has a nice blooming effect, almost like an elongated lily of some sort. I feel like this frames a tie and collar in a distinctly more dramatic fashion than the Southwick does.
For those of you who, like me, get the majority of your jackets second hand either thrifting, on ebay, or through the various classified boards on menswear fora, one solid way of determining whether your 3 button jacket was meant to be a 3 roll 2 is to compare the buttonhole finish on the three buttons. If the top one is nicer than the other two, it was probably meant to be a 3 roll 2. 
There are some tutorials around on how to reshape a 3 roll 2 that’s been haphazardly pressed into a hard 3 button by a dry cleaner who knew no better. I’ve done it before, and it works fine for me. Sure, you probably lose some of the intentional shaping that the tailors ironed into the jacket when it was first made, but in this instance the trade off is well worth it. And it wasn’t made for you in the first place if you’re buying it used.
I’ve even seen some folks (Eric over at acutestyle comes directly to mind) who have turned a lapel that was constructed as a 3 into a 3 roll 2 with some aggressive ironing and steaming. The results have looked pretty good to my eye.

The 3 roll 2 Lapel

These days people rarely want to wear 3 button suits or sport coats. It looks a little outdated, and was the norm in the 1990s—an era we are still hesitant about remembering for its sartorial choices. I have seen it tastefully done of late on some very stylish men who are clearly trying to bring it back. But I digress…

Something that’s been in vogue for quite some time within contemporary tailored menswear, however, is the 3 roll 2 button/lapel configuration. It seems pretty de rigueur on most soft structured Neapolitan-style jackets these days, and has long been the favorite of the American Ivy League and ‘Traditional’ set. You know, the ‘man in the grey flannel suit,’ and the titular ‘man in the Brooks Brothers shirt’ in Mary McCarthy’s short story of the same name.

And though I’m no expert at these things, I have found in my limited experience that Americans and Italians (as in many other things) generally approach the 3 roll 2 differently.

Pictured here is a quintessentially American example of the form. It’s a navy hopsack blazer by Southwick from The Andover Shop. You’d be hard pressed to get more traditional than that. Note the fine finishing on the interior of the top buttonhole. It’s clearly meant to be seen, and not hidden under the roll of a lapel. The other two buttons are not finished nearly as nicely on the unseen side of the jacket. This lapel rolls smoothly, and quite low. There would be no mistaking the fact that it ought not be buttoned at the top button. Some Brooks Brothers and J. Press jackets I own have a much more aggressive and hard 3 roll 2 lapel.  The lapel doesn’t begin rolling much until below the top buttonhole on those. It’s a different look, and one that I personally like less.

On the other hand, I’ve noticed that the Italian jackets that I own that are 3 roll 2 do so a little higher up on the lapel, and always in a very subtle manner. The jacket, when buttoned, has a nice blooming effect, almost like an elongated lily of some sort. I feel like this frames a tie and collar in a distinctly more dramatic fashion than the Southwick does.

For those of you who, like me, get the majority of your jackets second hand either thrifting, on ebay, or through the various classified boards on menswear fora, one solid way of determining whether your 3 button jacket was meant to be a 3 roll 2 is to compare the buttonhole finish on the three buttons. If the top one is nicer than the other two, it was probably meant to be a 3 roll 2. 

There are some tutorials around on how to reshape a 3 roll 2 that’s been haphazardly pressed into a hard 3 button by a dry cleaner who knew no better. I’ve done it before, and it works fine for me. Sure, you probably lose some of the intentional shaping that the tailors ironed into the jacket when it was first made, but in this instance the trade off is well worth it. And it wasn’t made for you in the first place if you’re buying it used.

I’ve even seen some folks (Eric over at acutestyle comes directly to mind) who have turned a lapel that was constructed as a 3 into a 3 roll 2 with some aggressive ironing and steaming. The results have looked pretty good to my eye.

Fit Pic Triptych.

Jacket: Southwick, thrifted $15

Shirt: Uniqlo, $20

Belt: Narragansett Leathers, $35

Jeans: Gustin Jeans, courtesy of Gustin

Socks: Corgi, Barneys New York outlet $7

Shoes: Red Wing Wabasha, Nordstrom Rack $55

Casual, basic, and tres Americain.

Casual, basic, and tres Americain.

Jacket: Southwick for The Andover Shop, thrifted $17
Shirt: BB Slim Fit, thrifted $7
Tie: English Silk Repp from Cable Car Clothiers, thrifted $2
Pocket Square: Solosso, courtesy of Solosso

Jacket: Southwick for The Andover Shop, thrifted $17

Shirt: BB Slim Fit, thrifted $7

Tie: English Silk Repp from Cable Car Clothiers, thrifted $2

Pocket Square: Solosso, courtesy of Solosso

Boo Tradley.

Boo Tradley.

Jacket: Southwick, thrifted $8
Shirt: J. Lawrence Khaki’s MTM, courtesy of Khaki’s of Carmel (review forthcoming)
Pants: Brooks Brothers, $30

Jacket: Southwick, thrifted $8

Shirt: J. Lawrence Khaki’s MTM, courtesy of Khaki’s of Carmel (review forthcoming)

Pants: Brooks Brothers, $30

The American hard 3 roll 2, as done by Southwick.

The American hard 3 roll 2, as done by Southwick.

Jacket: Southwick, thrifted $15
Pocket Square: Courtesy of MVO Designs
Tie: Vintage Repp, estate sale ~.75

Jacket: Southwick, thrifted $15

Pocket Square: Courtesy of MVO Designs

Tie: Vintage Repp, estate sale ~.75