Broke and Bespoke

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Gant USA ‘The Adirondack Coat’

I stopped by a thrift shop yesterday that’s pretty hit or miss and found this great Gant USA (not Rugger or Bastian) waxed cotton ‘Adirondack Coat’ for $15. It’s a generous size M, and fits comfortably over a sport coat and will be perfect for rainy days when a substantial outer layer is required to stay dry. We’ve had some pretty heavy rain here lately, but a part of me fears it has probably passed for the year…

The jacket was made in Portugal and features a nice cotton flannel gun club check lining, moleskin lined button placket, a throat latch, and a long center vent that has a button closure about halfway lengthwise. It appears to have been worn rarely, if ever, by its previous owner.

Outtake: 12/31/12

Outtake: 12/31/12

I just brought up some winter clothes from storage and there are a lot of nice tweeds I haven’t seen or worn in awhile, including this vintage Scottish District Check jacket. This jacket has a 3 button stance, and lapels that are quite thin. Note also the hand sewn lapel buttonhole. Thought the tweed is Scottish, the jacket itself was made in England.

Here’s a picture set of the full shawl collar cardigan+tweed jacket outfit. I used to feel like the substantial nature of a shawl collar sweater made it incompatible with a notch lapeled jacket, but have since overcome the sense that that was some sort of sartorial peccadillo. 

The jacket is the $30 Vintage Chaps Ralph Lauren mentioned the other day in the post about one of my favorite thrifting spots being blown up. Though $30 is much more than I like to pay for a thrifted jacket, I really loved the fabric, and it is in perfect condition—the pockets were still sewn shut, despite the fact that it’s got to be almost 20 years old. I wouldn’t pay that kind of money for newer Chaps stuff, but this jacket was made in the USA, and features fully canvassed construction. $30 well spent, I think.

I’ve been summoned to jury duty today, but have queued up some posts about layering chunky cardigans under bold tweeds. I think that contrary to what some might believe, and counter to what feels intuitive, a shawl collar cardigan can look quite nice underneath a bold and heavy tweed sport coat. Though it’s oddly in the 70s-80s around here this week, I’m looking forward to wearing layers like this as soon as the mercury dips.

I think pairing dark rinse or raw denim with more English ‘country’-inspired looks up top is a nice way to look both dressed-up and casual simultaneously. Here’s a couple of detail shots from this future outfit. More pics to come of the full look with tweed jacket.

Sweater: Lands’ End Canvas, clearance $30

Shirt: Gant OCBD, thrifted $3

Tie: Generic Italian-made silk number, thrifted .50

Jeans: APC New Standard, gift from friend

Shoes: Vintage Florsheim Royal Imperial, antiques market $45

Shoe Trees: Vintage Florsheim Royal Imperial, thrifted $1.50

Items You Should Always Look for First in Your Local Thrift Store/s: The Blue OCBD
Inspired by Kiyoshi’s post today over at The Silentist regarding investment-worthy wardrobe essentials, in this case Brooks Brothers’ white OCBD, I thought I’d post a short piece on another wardrobe essential that you should always look for first in your local thrift before investing in one off-the-rack or MTM.
The classic blue oxford cloth button down, or, as it is often more affectionately referred to, the blue OCBD. This shirt is a classic for a reason, and its perceived classic-ness has made it the go-to ‘dress’ shirt for many an American man for some years now. Though it is not a formal dress shirt per se, the decline in the American man’s sartorial sensibilities over the last several decades left the blue OCBD alone as the one ‘dress’ shirt every man thought he ought to own. Reduced from its glory days as the casual shirt par excellence of the Ivy/collegiate set, it had earned a place in the desolate sartorial landscape of fin de siecle menswear as the shirt to be worn for work interviews, to weddings, an anniversary dinner, whatever…
Not to worry, this sad story about a classic garment’s decline has some bright sides to it too. They exist in abundance. Tucked away somewhere in almost every American man’s wardrobe is at least one blue OCBD. Many of these make their way to the thrift shops as some men have moved even further away from any pretensions towards dressiness, and have settled into the comforts of doing any and everything in gym shorts and flip-flops. Others who have embraced the sartorial renaissance in menswear may have gotten rid of some blue OCBDs that no longer meet their exacting standards, or ones that may have fit their more corpulent selves of yesteryear.
These are your thrift store gems. The guy who now only buys American-made clothing, and has cast off his perfectly fine Polo blue OCBDs made in Hong Kong, Malaysia, or elsewhere. The man who started hitting the gym 5 times a week, and has lost 40 lbs since his last birthday…He’s got no need for his Brooks Bros. blue OCBD, he wears extra-slim now dammit!
Most regions of the nation with a modicum of suburbanity or any pretenses towards cosmopolitanism (i.e., almost all of the U.S.) will be supersaturated with the blue OCBD, and the local thrifts will be similarly overstocked with them. I cannot tell you how many blue OCBDs I flip past every single time I go thrifting. It is the one garment (besides relaxed fit pleated khakis) that I see the most. If you’re working on building a solid warbdrobe, but want to save your money for those investment-worthy pieces that Kiyoshi is writing about, then give your local thrift a look for a blue OCBD, I’m guessing you’ll be pleasantly surprised by what you find.

Items You Should Always Look for First in Your Local Thrift Store/s: The Blue OCBD

Inspired by Kiyoshi’s post today over at The Silentist regarding investment-worthy wardrobe essentials, in this case Brooks Brothers’ white OCBD, I thought I’d post a short piece on another wardrobe essential that you should always look for first in your local thrift before investing in one off-the-rack or MTM.

The classic blue oxford cloth button down, or, as it is often more affectionately referred to, the blue OCBD. This shirt is a classic for a reason, and its perceived classic-ness has made it the go-to ‘dress’ shirt for many an American man for some years now. Though it is not a formal dress shirt per se, the decline in the American man’s sartorial sensibilities over the last several decades left the blue OCBD alone as the one ‘dress’ shirt every man thought he ought to own. Reduced from its glory days as the casual shirt par excellence of the Ivy/collegiate set, it had earned a place in the desolate sartorial landscape of fin de siecle menswear as the shirt to be worn for work interviews, to weddings, an anniversary dinner, whatever…

Not to worry, this sad story about a classic garment’s decline has some bright sides to it too. They exist in abundance. Tucked away somewhere in almost every American man’s wardrobe is at least one blue OCBD. Many of these make their way to the thrift shops as some men have moved even further away from any pretensions towards dressiness, and have settled into the comforts of doing any and everything in gym shorts and flip-flops. Others who have embraced the sartorial renaissance in menswear may have gotten rid of some blue OCBDs that no longer meet their exacting standards, or ones that may have fit their more corpulent selves of yesteryear.

These are your thrift store gems. The guy who now only buys American-made clothing, and has cast off his perfectly fine Polo blue OCBDs made in Hong Kong, Malaysia, or elsewhere. The man who started hitting the gym 5 times a week, and has lost 40 lbs since his last birthday…He’s got no need for his Brooks Bros. blue OCBD, he wears extra-slim now dammit!

Most regions of the nation with a modicum of suburbanity or any pretenses towards cosmopolitanism (i.e., almost all of the U.S.) will be supersaturated with the blue OCBD, and the local thrifts will be similarly overstocked with them. I cannot tell you how many blue OCBDs I flip past every single time I go thrifting. It is the one garment (besides relaxed fit pleated khakis) that I see the most. If you’re working on building a solid warbdrobe, but want to save your money for those investment-worthy pieces that Kiyoshi is writing about, then give your local thrift a look for a blue OCBD, I’m guessing you’ll be pleasantly surprised by what you find.

Jacket: Beijing Bespoke linen unstructured jacket, $55
Shirt: Gant OCBD, thrifted $3.50
Tie: Philippe Perrier Shantung silk, thrifted .50
Pocket Square: Echo scarf, thrifted $3

Jacket: Beijing Bespoke linen unstructured jacket, $55

Shirt: Gant OCBD, thrifted $3.50

Tie: Philippe Perrier Shantung silk, thrifted .50

Pocket Square: Echo scarf, thrifted $3

Temperature has dropped. Nothing better than tweed in bright colors!
Jacket: Southwick orangey-brown herringbone with yellow and lime green windowpaning, StyleForum B+S $25
Shirt: Gant OCBD, thrifted $3.50
Tie: Borrelli, thrifted .50
Pocket Square: Vintage Anne Klein scarf, thrifted $2

Temperature has dropped. Nothing better than tweed in bright colors!

Jacket: Southwick orangey-brown herringbone with yellow and lime green windowpaning, StyleForum B+S $25

Shirt: Gant OCBD, thrifted $3.50

Tie: Borrelli, thrifted .50

Pocket Square: Vintage Anne Klein scarf, thrifted $2

A pic for the preps.

A pic for the preps.