Broke and Bespoke

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Denim Repair
First off, sorry for the strange and vaguely icky picture. Since it’s summer now and I’m off work and have more leeway in terms of casual dress, and because I’ve been inspired by my recent visit to the Gustin Jeans factory, I thought I might post a few words on denim repair. Thus, the disembodied crotch shot from some of my current and erstwhile favorite jeans. 
When I was younger and wore normal jeans from Levi’s or the Gap daily, crotch blowout was never a problem. It wasn’t until I started wearing more expensive denim that they started to prematurely fall apart. This is puzzling in many ways, not least because of the overused mantra around these parts about buy better buy less. But, to be fair, I chalk it up at least in part to the fact that the jeans I was wearing once I made the plunge into raw denim were a) tighter fitting and b) rarely got washed, which I hear can weaken fibers, and so on.
Whatever the causes, and despite the pseudoscience used to justify $250 jeans exploding after a couple of months of daily wear (i.e., body sweat and the aforementioned body oils weakening fibers), there does exist the possibility for repair. Some would say a repaired jean is a badge of honor, a mark of pride one can take in denim they’ve worn hard. I say,”&*#@, I spent a lot of money on these jeans, and now I have to pay even more to have this stupid hole patched up…??!”
There are fancy denim boutiques which have denim repair services. Anyone can send their jeans across the country to these coastal burgs to have someone painstakingly match thread to the exact shade of fading your damaged jeans have reached, and from there sew overlapping layers of stitching to create an almost seamless looking repair. Some artisanal denim purveyors, I’ve heard, will even repair jeans you’ve purchased from them for free for the life of the jean. 
Another option is to go to your local tailor. It’s what I do. He’s very good, and his denim repairs look no different to me than the ones I see in the Japanese denim magazines I always browse through when I go to Japantown. It costs less that the alternatives, and he’s surely logged a lot more hours behind a sewing machine than the dude at the denim shop who learned these repairs following an untranslated diagram from one of the above mentioned Japanese denim magazines.
* Jeans from L to R: A.P.C. Petit Standard (unrepaired); Pure Blue Japan (no flaws); Men Without a Country (premature crotch rip repaired); Nudie (repaired)

Denim Repair

First off, sorry for the strange and vaguely icky picture. Since it’s summer now and I’m off work and have more leeway in terms of casual dress, and because I’ve been inspired by my recent visit to the Gustin Jeans factory, I thought I might post a few words on denim repair. Thus, the disembodied crotch shot from some of my current and erstwhile favorite jeans. 

When I was younger and wore normal jeans from Levi’s or the Gap daily, crotch blowout was never a problem. It wasn’t until I started wearing more expensive denim that they started to prematurely fall apart. This is puzzling in many ways, not least because of the overused mantra around these parts about buy better buy less. But, to be fair, I chalk it up at least in part to the fact that the jeans I was wearing once I made the plunge into raw denim were a) tighter fitting and b) rarely got washed, which I hear can weaken fibers, and so on.

Whatever the causes, and despite the pseudoscience used to justify $250 jeans exploding after a couple of months of daily wear (i.e., body sweat and the aforementioned body oils weakening fibers), there does exist the possibility for repair. Some would say a repaired jean is a badge of honor, a mark of pride one can take in denim they’ve worn hard. I say,”&*#@, I spent a lot of money on these jeans, and now I have to pay even more to have this stupid hole patched up…??!”

There are fancy denim boutiques which have denim repair services. Anyone can send their jeans across the country to these coastal burgs to have someone painstakingly match thread to the exact shade of fading your damaged jeans have reached, and from there sew overlapping layers of stitching to create an almost seamless looking repair. Some artisanal denim purveyors, I’ve heard, will even repair jeans you’ve purchased from them for free for the life of the jean. 

Another option is to go to your local tailor. It’s what I do. He’s very good, and his denim repairs look no different to me than the ones I see in the Japanese denim magazines I always browse through when I go to Japantown. It costs less that the alternatives, and he’s surely logged a lot more hours behind a sewing machine than the dude at the denim shop who learned these repairs following an untranslated diagram from one of the above mentioned Japanese denim magazines.

* Jeans from L to R: A.P.C. Petit Standard (unrepaired); Pure Blue Japan (no flaws); Men Without a Country (premature crotch rip repaired); Nudie (repaired)

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